Pride and Not Seeking Solutions Keep You from Succeeding!

Right before I quit my job, I started a combined algebra and statistics class as a way to being growing my web analysis skills for my eventual career transition to a content strategist.  

So back to my story…

The last math class I took was 20 years ago.  My phobia of taking understand statistics.  When the professor told me 10 percent of the students who took the course the previous semester passedRight before I quit my job, I started a combined algebra and statistics class as a way to being growing my web analysis skills for my eventual career transition to a content strategist.  

So back to my story…

The last math class I took was 20 years ago.  My phobia of taking another math course propelled me to take an accelerated course for statistics that included the algebra that is required to understand statistics.  When the professor told me 10 percent of the students who took the course the previous semester passed, but that if you studied you’d be fine, I felt good.  (I can work hard so if that’s what it takes – so I thought!)

Then I got my first homework back which was an 85% and got my first take home test.  Let’s just say it was not an 85%.  While I was frustrated that my teacher wasn’t providing us with enough practice problems, I realized it wasn’t his job to do that.  It was his job to teach the concepts and provide homework that reflected what he taught us.

Long story short, I reached out to the chair of the math department and asked him for his advice.  I told him that it has been almost 2 decades since I took a math class much less used algebra and yes, admitted, I was struggling to stay on course for my current class but that I wanted to succeed.  He recommended I beg an intermediate algebra course professor to take me in his/her class now and take statistics class next semester (the course I’m currently in is an accelerated version of two full-semester courses, you see), which would give me the entire semester to relearn algebra.  

So off I went today during my daughter’s nap today (thank you, husband, for taking his lunch at home), to the math chair’s office to fill out the drop and add forms and we walked over to the dean’s office for the final signature.  I missed the official drop date last week so will lose a couple of hundred dollars (pride costs money too!).  I’ll know Monday if the dean will sign off on the move.

So the lesson?  I didn’t want to take a lower algebra class.  Did I need to?  Yes.  

Sometimes the solutions we seek for problems, challenges, annoyances we are experiencing are right in front of us but we are too prideful to do what we must do to succeed.

I need to know statistics for web analytics.  My pride in not wanting to say I needed to get back to basics prevented me from dropping the class in the first 2 weeks but my desire to succeed bolstered me to ask for help from the math chair.

Am I glad to be taking an intermediate algebra class?  No.  Am I glad I’m taking the appropriate course so I can continue to grow in the direction I want (statistics)?  Yes.  

In the end, I lost a couple of hundred dollars but I learned to ask for and implement some good advice to keep me on track for my career transition., but that if you studied you’d be fine, I felt good.  (I can work hard so if that’s what it takes – so I thought!)

Then I got my first homework back which was an 85% and got my first take home test.  Let’s just say it was not an 85%.  While I was frustrated that my teacher wasn’t providing us with enough practice problems, I realized it wasn’t his job to do that.  It was his job to teach the concepts and provide homework that reflected what he taught us.

Long story short, I reached out to the chair of the math department and asked him for his advice.  I told him that it has been almost 2 decades since I took a math class much less used algebra and yes, admitted, I was struggling to stay on course for my current class but that I wanted to succeed.  He recommended I beg an intermediate algebra course professor to take me in his/her class now and take statistics class next semester (the course I’m currently in is an accelerated version of two full-semester courses, you see), which would give me the entire semester to relearn algebra.  

So off I went today during my daughter’s nap today (thank you, husband, for taking his lunch at home), to the math chair’s office to fill out the drop and add forms and we walked over to the dean’s office for the final signature.  I missed the official drop date last week so will lose a couple of hundred dollars (pride costs money too!).  I’ll know Monday if the dean will sign off on the move.

So the lesson?  I didn’t want to take a lower algebra class.  Did I need to?  Yes.  

Sometimes the solutions we seek for problems, challenges, annoyances we are experiencing are right in front of us but we are too prideful to do what we must do to succeed.

I need to know statistics for web analytics.  My pride in not wanting to say I needed to get back to basics prevented me from dropping the class in the first 2 weeks but my desire to succeed bolstered me to ask for help from the math chair.

Am I glad to be taking an intermediate algebra class?  No.  Am I glad I’m taking the appropriate course so I can continue to grow in the direction I want (statistics)?  Yes.  

In the end, I lost a couple of hundred dollars but I learned to ask for and implement some good advice to keep me on track for my career transition.

“And that,” as Martha Stewart would say, “is a good thing.”

Proverbs 11:2 – When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom.

Do you have some lessons you learned as they relate to pride and success?  Please share!

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